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Could It Be More Than A Hobby?

Posted on May 21, 2017 at 5:56 PM Comments comments (327)
I want to start out by saying that this post may hurt some feelings. Though this isn't the reaction I'd like to stir, this is a topic I've been wanting to cover. All of us know a person who bought a nice DSLR and decided to be a photographer. We all know that girl who helped her friend plan a party, and now considers herself an event planner. Or that friend who brings cupcakes to a party, and overnight decided to be a wedding cake designer. As someone in the event industry, maybe this pushes a button for you. I'll be honest and tell you, that for me, seeing this is concerning.

Jumping into the event industry doesn't happen overnight. You work your butt off, register your business, and you build your portfolio. My personal timeline looked a little different, as I am working on weddings without having a portfolio of my own. This is the beauty of interning and/or working for someone who has put in the work, gained the respect, and wants you to be an extension of that brand. 


So why can't you just "become" this industry professional? For starters, you need experience. I promise, planning a wedding isn't something you do on a whim for a few hundred dollars. It's a lot of work! What happens if the sound system doesn't work, or the toilet paper is empty (yes, that is part of your job)? How do you put together a proper budget? How do you know which venue to recommend? Find a planner or coordinator that will let you follow or intern for them. Learn the in's and out's of the job you think you want. Get as much knowledge as you can.

Another important subject to cover while on the topic: money. Something I see happening very often, are people who start these overnight businesses charging really low prices for their services. I get it, you want to appeal to people, and charging less is what gets attention. Before you decide to charge $200 for 6 weeks of planning, think about all of the time and energy you are about to put in for this client. Are you really only worth $5 an hour?? Working with a seasoned professional will help you understand the difference between "less expensive", and downright "cheap". 

Lastly, I have to pound into your brain the importance of registering your business with the state. Sure, you have a nice camera, and you need to make fast money this weekend. Offering a $30 (cash only) mini session and pocketing all of that money isn't the way to do it. I have a personal story to share that will show you what happens when your business isn't legitimate. A friend of mine hired a guy who took really great pictures to be their wedding photographer. He showed up, took the pictures they wanted, and went home to work on the images. Six weeks later, the couple didn't have any images, but he was using them on his Facebook to promote his new "wedding packages". After three more weeks, and more unreturned voicemails, the couple decided to call the BBB (Better Business Bureau). After finding out that the photographer never registered his business, the BBB alerted the proper channels, and now that man owes the state a lot of money. Unfortunately, the couple still doesn't have access to any pictures of their special day. 



Please, don't let this put a bad taste in your mouth for the event industry, that is not my intent. I wanted to bring up this subject because of its importance to those in the industry, and those trying to be a part of it. When I was younger, and trying to find ways to get into the industry and be known quickly, I wish someone would have sat down and told me what I was doing wasn't helping myself. Not only was I not being taken seriously, I didn't know how to pay myself, or how to brand myself as a respectable business. Thankfully, I was introduced to a person who had built up her business into a respected, well known brand, and she wanted to invest in me. 

If you are serious about becoming part of the event world, then get your name out there and show your willingness to work hard. I promise, it's a crazy industry, but it is full of great people who would love to teach you how to properly construct a company. What kind of tips do you have to offer to those looking to start an industry based career? What kind of questions do you have for those who are established industry professionals? 

Rain Wedding Planning 2017

Posted on May 7, 2017 at 9:33 PM Comments comments (168)
Hi all! Samantha here, Meredith’s assistant and social media manager. I’ve taken over the blog, and am really excited to share all of the neat things going on with Rain Wedding Planning, as well as cool industry happenings. To start, I thought my first post should give you a little background on who I am, and why I chose to leap into the event industry!

I was a sophomore in high school when I decided to start my home-based bakery. I loved making cookies for classmates, muffins for teachers, and I always loved to try new cupcake flavors. Jumping into the baking world was natural; I did a few local graduation parties, a baby shower or two, and I had a handful of regular customers who purchased my breads. I was loving it! I told myself that as long as things stayed this way, and that I never dabbled into the wedding scene, I would be able to keep this up forever. 

So... I started baking and creating wedding cakes & dessert displays my freshman year of college, which proved to be difficult as I was attending The Ohio State University, yet my weddings were in Northeast Ohio. Though it was tough, I was enjoying the small part I played in the special day of two people, so I continued to do so for the next few years. 

When I moved back home, my mother had accepted a new position at a local winery as their in-house private event coordinator. Learning about all that she did was a thrill to me, and it showed me a side of the event industry that I had never been a part of; the client meetings, setting rooms, caterers, rain delays, etc. I didn’t know just how much went into an 8-10 hour day. With my mom having the position she held, I was also able to work the events she booked, so I had the opportunity to be a bartender, banquet server, assistant planner, caterer, and the clean-up crew (not my favorite). 

From that point on, I knew that I had found my place in the industry that once scared me so much. I wanted to be that jack-of-all-trades that my mother was. And then, I met Meredith. Being a part of Rain Wedding Planning has taught me so much! I’ve delved even further into the event industry, met amazing leaders in the community, explored incredible venues, and am learning something new every single day. The social media side of what I do comes from a few things: I’m a millennial! It’s bred into my age group, thankfully, because I know how confusing all of this tech stuff can get. Other than that, I run my own side hustle through my personal social media pages, as well as having a lifestyle blog. 


I can’t express how excited I am for all that is happening with Rain Wedding Planning. 2017 is about to be one wild ride, so sit back and buckle up. Thank you all for being a part of the journey thus far, and be sure to keep track of us via Facebook, we have a lot to share with you, so stay tuned! 

Bridal show season is just around the corner

Posted on December 23, 2013 at 11:22 AM Comments comments (154)
Bridal season is just around the corner.
 
 We here at Rain Wedding Planning, understand how over whelming planning can be.
So if you are just starting, or looking for a final touch, this is the perfect chance to sit one on one with a planner and make sure you are at a good place.
 
Stop by our interactive Planners Lounge at the Ever After Bridal Event  on January 5th at Executive Caterers of Landerhaven for your chance to sit down with one of our talented planners, and get your questions answered.  We like to think of it as Wedding 101.
 You have questions….we have answers.
Did you know that a trained wedding planner is actually a product of solution to your needs not your problems.
 Problems cause worry….no need to worry when you choose to sit down with a planner.
 
Have a chance to look at our Pintrest boards, and share yours with us. Thinking of a signature drink, we have the recipes you want!
 
Love to Dance in the Rain?
 You will have a chance to reserve your space, and learn more about this amazing approach to planning.
Dancing in the Rain is a marriage between two key aspects of your wedding, your Planning and Entertainment. You are covered under our Umbrella as we Rock the House!
 
Think you don’t need to sit down with a planner because your venue “comes with one”.
It is the BIGGEST MYTH when it comes to planning your wedding. Remember your venue coordinators’ first responsibility is to the venue. Your wedding planner’s first responsibility is you.  PERIOD! 
 We are blessed to have great relationships with the area’s top venue coordinators we work with them to help create your dreams.
 
Or the famous difference between Month of and Day Of WeddingCoordination….Yes, there is a HUGE difference.
 
Mom….are you the wedding planner? We can help you too…we are not just limited to Brides, we welcome ALL who have a question.
 
It’s okay not to know….let us educate you, there are noquestions off limits, and honest, if we do not know the answer, we will findit. It’s what a planner does. We help, we educate, we reduce your stress, andwe find the solution to your needs. Because no two weddings are alike, and you deserve it.
.
 

Linen Rentals

Posted on March 18, 2012 at 11:30 AM Comments comments (183)
Rain Linen Rentals

Need Couture Linen Rentals for a Wedding, or Special event Rain Linen Rentals has something for everyone and every budget. We specialized in wedding linen rentals, chair covers including sashes, and napkins. Our linen rental delivery, and set up team travels all of North East Ohio, including Akron/Canton and Youngstown/ Warren.


Our linen rentals range from simply elegant to intricate and runway worthy. We understand each and every event is different, therefore our designers can accommodate most needs. Basically, we are proud to offer a wide variety of choices for any event that you are planning. 

Our linen rental collection ranges from rich colors, patterns, designs and textures. As a client you will have the opportunity to choose from current collections.

From the beginning we have provided the best customer service, timely delivery and pickup. This is a priority for our customers, and therefore it is ours as well.
Create, envision and enjoy some ideas through our Inspiration galleries. Use our interactive table design center, see your vision before you order.

Ask about or Special packages and quarterly wedding linen and chair cover sash combo deals as well as discounts when you combine, linen rental with any of our planning services

A combination of linen rentals can complement your room in many forms,
for example: a color can seduce your theme by elevating from simple to elegant; romantic, dramatic, bold, fierce, etc. The point? The sky is the limit.

Give us a call and let your imagination run wild.


Northeast Ohio Consultants
Meredith Masaveg
440-231-4095
 
Ann Marie
440-227-5692
 
Youngstown/Warren Consultant
Becky Poling
330-219-4107

Your Engaged!!!!!! Now what???

Posted on January 4, 2012 at 2:16 PM Comments comments (305)
You are engaged! 
Congratulations!
Many of us have dreamed of this special day when our white knight rides up and “wisks” us off to happily ever after.  Reality is, he may be the white knight and you will have the happily ever after, but there is not any “wisking”!

You have a wedding to plan. 
Easy right?
 Not really.
 
There is a date to choose, venue to find, your DJ, photographer, flowers, bridal gown…so many things.  Where do you start?  Hire a planner?  Maybe.  Maybe not.  That is totally dependent on you, your time, your budget, your attention to detail, problem solving skills, and how much stress you can handle.

Okay so you can do it…where do you start? 
How do you know the ‘good’ places to go and who the reputable vendors are. It is not everyday most of us plan weddings so unless you have recently helped someone else or know someone in the wedding business you are going into unfamiliar territory.

Some things you can do to make your job easier and help you decide if a planner is a resource you would like to have working with you.
 
  • First determine your budget.  Nothing else matters unless you know how much money you have available.
  • Pick a wedding date – sounds silly, but very important.  You have to know this to book a venue and your vendors. If budget is a bit tight and you are flexible, many venues and vendors will offer discounts if you get married on a weekday.
  • Make a list of must haves; would love to have, but can do without; and if we have extra money we will do this
  • Make a guest list.  Remember your reception (venue, food, drink, decorations, favors) will be about 45% of your budget so limiting head count can go a long way in saving money
  • Research vendors or if you have decided you don’t want a planner for the process, hire one for a consultation and recommendations of vendors/venue.  This will help you start and not cost you too much.
  • Meet with your vendors if possible.  How customer service orientated do they seem?  How flexible on what they offer?  This is your wedding and you should be able to have what you want.  What is their price range and is it comparable with others? If possible look at the quality of their work (photographers, videographers).  Do you ‘get along with them’?  This is huge especially for photographer, videographer, DJ and even your planner.  These are people who will be with you for your wedding day and rapport  is important.
 
This is a simplistic view of what needs to be done, but gives general guidance.

 When your wedding day comes, you need someone directing the rehearsal and managing your day.  Things will go wrong.   Follow up to confirm before the wedding is imperative.  Creative thinking and the ability to deal with stress is a must on your wedding day.  You, your fiance and family do not want to have to deal with this.  You can hire a planner for ‘Day of Coordination’ or if you still are determined you want to do this on your own, choose a trusted friend who is not part of the wedding and assign this task to them.

 Having been to weddings without a planner and also attending ones as a guest where there is a planner (and of course being the planner), my opinion is if nothing else talk to a planner for guidance.  Find one who offers hourly rates or a small guidance package.  I also think hiring someone to manage your wedding day is paramount with success.  This is our job, this is what we ‘live and breathe’.  We know how to manage it, help you, be there for the problems, and make your day perfect so you and your white knight can finally be “wisked off” to happily ever after.

And remember....
Help Your Planner Help You...
Stay tuned for our next exciting blog!!


Why Wedding Coordination Costs “So Much”

Posted on August 25, 2011 at 12:19 AM Comments comments (105)
So why does Wedding Coordination cost
"So Much" ?

We have noticed that many couples don’t understand the importance of wedding coordinators and some wedding planning professionals have cut wedding coordination out of their list of services altogether.  As such, it seems that many brides and grooms fail to appreciate the role of a wedding coordinator and their costs– as we have heard things said like:

  • “I only need someone for the day. Can’t you just come on the day of?”
  • “I’m a type-A personality and highly detailed so I enjoy the planning, so I don’t really need a lot of help”
  • “We’ve done all of our planning and have about $400 left for a coordinator”
 
Now, this isn’t the norm– but with the economy’s downturn, people had become very creative with their inquiries and excuses.  So when they hear that wedding day of coordination could cost thousands, they are shocked.  Let’s clear up some misconceptions:
 
First, no one is just “showing up” on the day of your wedding to coordinate it.
 That’s not day of coordination. That’s damage control.  This is much like you going into a doctor’s office and saying, “I don’t need you to do any tests on me, I’m pretty smart and really detailed.  So, what I’m going to need you to do is just show up at the operating room and do the surgery for me”.  You basically want the doctor to do a procedure “cold”, without knowing anything about your medical history, predispositions, or the medical team of nurses, anesthesiologists, etc. you’ve secured.   The same is said for clients who expect wedding planners and coordinators to do the same thing.  It is expected that the clients want someone to appear a few hours before the ceremony, set up a few place cards, fluff the peonies, tell your grandmother when to walk and cue you when to cut the cake.  That is truly the watered down version of what a wedding coordinator does.  That is only what you see.
 
It takes more than one day to coordinate
a wedding.
 Truth be told, it takes anywhere to 4 to 6 weeks to coordinate ONE day.  Those weeks consists of pulling together logistics, reviewing the event team’s contracts to confirm responsibiities and obligations, contacting your bridal party to make sure they know their duties and needed locations, finalizing payments, scheduling load-ins and strikes, creating timelines, event layouts, seating charts and more.  By the time your wedding day rolls around, your coordinator will have put in at least 8 hours on your wedding. I’ve heard many brides laugh and say, “Oh, I don’t need all of that”.  I laugh right back and say “Of course you don’t. But your caterer and photographer does…” It’s your job to be the bride, so there are many details that you may not have thought of.
 
Think of it as major motion picture company finding the right movie director for their new hot blockbuster.
 While a movie producer finds the talent, supervises and controls the funding, and other important duties.  The parallel would be your full service wedding planner.  The movie director is the person who directs the making of the film.  They control the artistic and dramatic aspects, and work to visualize the script while guiding the technical crew and actors in the fulfillment of that vision. That, my friend, is your wedding coordinator.  You supply the vision, they make sure that everyone else is on the same page so that the vision can come to fruition.  With something as important as a blockbuster movie, as an investment, the motion picture company would never bring in a director on the day of a final shoot.  Directors are hired early enough to get a feel for the film so that they know it like the backs of their hand.  This allows them to know which cameras need to be where, The location of boom mics, pans and zooms and so much more.  Again, the same is said of your wedding coordinator.  They are able to see your event before it happens, making it possible to avoid pitfalls, timing clashes between vendors and other important factors.
 
So this is why wedding coordination “costs” so much.  The experience, commitment and savvy your coordinator brings your wedding is an asset and benefit to your event as a whole.  We will tell you the same thing I tell our team before each and every wedding: there are no do overs. While you may be extremely detailed, a planner by nature or profession, or have a really good friend or Maid of Honor who can help you, wedding coordinators do this every weekend.  You’ll only do it once.  They know the ins and outs, what works and what doesn’t.  What sounds good in theory, may not work at all for your wedding. Nothing replaces the ability of having your own personal event director/producer on your side to make sure that your vision happens while you’re enjoying your day.
 
Stepping off our rhinestone soapbox…

P.S.– Keeping in mind what we  just described about what the weeks prior to your wedding could entail production-wise, beware of $200 “wedding coordinators” or “free” wedding venue coordinators.  You get what you pay for.

How to Work Well with Your Wedding Coordinator

Posted on August 25, 2011 at 12:02 AM Comments comments (62)
How to Work Well with Your Wedding Coordinator
So, the day is finally here!
All the hard work, preparation, planning and hard work is about to pay off.  You’ve, in your infinite wisdom, hired a wedding coordinator to protect your investment and allow you to actually enjoy  your wedding day.  Here are some tips if you decide to work with a personal wedding coordinator:

 Assume they (the planner) knows nothing! 
If your wedding coordinator is coming in about a month prior to your wedding (as most should), they have not  been with you throughout your planning process and do not know the details of your wedding. Take this time to bring them up to speed and leave nothing out:  share your vendor contracts, disputes, ideas and changes so that they are able take everyone’s needs into consideration when building the timeline and coordinating other vendors.  For example, a typical mishap that occurs when  couples forget that their vendors have requested a meal for the wedding day (hot or otherwise).  Believe it or not, this can change the entire course of the day, but could’ve been easily prevented with earlier preparation.

Tell the family secrets. 
The same thing applies to any important family history your coordinator needs to be aware of. If your parents do not get along, it would be highly problematic to seat them together.  If your sister is prone to dramatic displays or your maid of honor has a peanut allergy, again—let your coordinator know as far in advance as possible.  What may seem little to you could ultimately disrupt well-laid plans that have been set.



Get your stuff together.
  If you are incorporating many DIY projects or personal items into your decor, you need to have them assembled, labeled, numbered, etc.  at least one week prior to the wedding.  It’s not really fair to dump a box of various pieces on your coordinator and her staff expecting them to turn your mess into fabulous.  Here are some great examples:
  • If you are utilizing escort cards, have them alphabetized and boxed, ready to be laid out.  If you are offering different meal selections, use a colored place card (as opposed to a card that holds a graphic of the meal choice). This makes it easier for the caterer’s staff to visually see who gets what at the table.  Be sure to  provide your coordinator with a list of the table assignments for each person.  This helps her work with your guests quickly if they become lost or there is a question as to table settings.
  • There are some decorative items that can be scored from retailers to add a personal, unique touch to your wedding.  Remember to use Goo Gone  to remove any stickers/adhesive, scuff marks, etc. We typically keep some in our kit for emergencies, but it works best when it has a chance to sit on whatever is going to be removed. 
  • If you are particular as to how some elements should be pieced together, provide an image of what it is you want as well as detailed instructions.  Otherwise, you may be disappointed with what the staff comes up with.
 
Decide who will have the last word.
 When your coordinator  works with you to build your timeline and event preparation documents, it will be assumed the details are final.  It can be extremely frustrating to arrive and begin working on what has been decided and agreed upon to have someone come along (your mother, bridesmaids, etc.) change the entire flow of things because they feel their way is better.  These unauthorized changes have the potential of throwing off several other vendors who are relying on your coordinator’s information (timelines, setup docs, etc.).  What may seem like a small change can affect several other vendors.  Make sure that you give your coordinator or someone else who knows the entire scope of the wedding final authority.

How much should I tip my wedding vendors?

Posted on July 29, 2011 at 12:45 AM Comments comments (81)
Tipping Wedding Vendors:
Rain's tipping guide
Who gets tipped and How much?

Tipping your wedding vendors is completely optional and should never be forced on ANY couple. Some vendors do offer tipping as part of their fees, but generally as a rule of thumb great service should dictate if tipping your vendors is warranted.

As in any other service industry, if your wedding vendor does an exceptional job, tips are always appreciated. It's a case by case basis and depends on your individual experience and what you believe to be fair.

In our research we've compiled a number of leading resources on etiquette and tipping to provide you a good general guideline for which vendors generally are tipped and by how much. Individual sites will indicate varying prices but this is a good starting point; and something that you would like  to keep in mind when working on your wedding budget.
.
Tips on Tipping
  • Tips should be given discreetly, in cash, and in individual envelopes.
  • Tips should be distributed by the reception host, best man, or the wedding coordinator right before the vendor leaves.
  • Vendors love thank you cards, kind words and glowing reviews if you enjoyed their services.
  • Read your contracts. Some vendors do include a tip as part of a service fee, when in doubt ask.

Hotel and Catering Staff
  • Caterer: 15%-20% of the total food and beverage bill (Usually included in the contract. Distributed to waiters, waitresses, table captains)
  • Bartender: 10% of bar bill (if separate from catering and not accepting tips from guests)
  • Parking Attendents: .50 - $1.00 per guest
  • Limo Drivers: 10%-15% (sometimes included in package)
  • Powder Room Attendents: .50 - $1.00 per guest

Wedding Professionals (Generally Tipped)
  • Wedding Planners: 10% - 20%
  • Clergy/Officiants: $100
  • Alter Servers: $10 - $25
  • Musicians (Cantors, Organists, Strings): $25 - $50
  • DJ: 10% - 20%
  • Band: 10% - 20%
  • Hair/Make-up: 15% - 20%

Wedding Professionals (Generally Not Tipped)
If out exceptional  service is provided, between 5% - 20% is acceptable for:
  • Photographers
  • Videographers
  • Baker
  • Jeweler
  • Wedding Consultant
  • Seamstress
  • Florist

In the end if they went above and beyond what they were required to do, helped make your day exceptional or otherwise took care of you tipping is always appreciated.

Creating Your Wedding Plan

Posted on July 26, 2011 at 10:55 AM Comments comments (119)
Creating Your Wedding Plan
By The Knot Editors
     
The secret to a gorgeous wedding is a definitive style and color scheme. And though carrying it through all the wedding day details may at first seem overwhelming, just take it one element at a time. To begin envisioning your perfect wedding day, you need to make some big-picture decisions. Decide the date (springtime, fall, winter?); the location (at home, in a ballroom, at a restaurant?); how formal it will be (sit-down dinner, laid-back brunch?); and the colors you’ll use. Once you’ve done this, all other style details will fall into place. So let’s get started.

When do we want our wedding to take place?
Whether fall is your favorite because of the foliage or you love spring because of the gardens, decide the season of your wedding and then settle on a month.

Where do we want to have our wedding/reception?
You may have decided long ago that your reception would take place at your favorite museum, or that you want all your family to gather for a reception at the country club. If you’re set on a particular location, use it to inspire the rest of your wedding day details. Some locations to consider:
  • Ballroom/hotel
  • Country club
  • Your home
  • Restaurant
  • Garden
  • Beach
  • Mountaintop
  • Loft
  • Yacht club
  • Art gallery
  • Flower shop

How formal will our wedding be?
Decide whether you’re after a formal affair or a casual wedding, or something in between. And consider dress code here: Will your guests wear tuxes and floor-length dresses? Or will it be more laid-back?
  • Formal/black-tie (an evening wedding — tuxes or jackets for the guys and floor-length dresses for the ladies)
  • Semiformal (a late-afternoon or evening wedding — ties but no jackets for the guys; cocktail attire for the ladies)
  • Casual/laid-back (an anytime affair — ties-optional for the guys, and sandals and laid-back dresses and skirts for the ladies)

What colors do we want to use?
If you have a favorite color, by all means use it on your wedding day to reflect your personalities. Carry your colors through from the invitations to the flowers, bridesmaid dresses, and reception décor for a unified look. If you’re in need of a little color direction, choose one main color and an accent color, or two equally prominent complementary colors. Some hot color combos:
  • Orange and pink
  • Green and blue
  • Black and white
  • Yellow and cream
  • Purple and brown
  • Turquoise and red

What’s our style?
From a traditional country club wedding to a modern loft affair, there are many ways to define your wedding day. Your reception site, colors, and the time of day will reflect your style. Some ideas include:
  • Traditional (at a country club, traditional gown and colors)
  • Modern (in a loft, sleek centerpieces, and a tall modern cake)
  • Intimate (at home, at a winery, or a restaurant)
  • Glamorous (totally over-the-top, from the centerpieces to a five-course menu)
  • Theme (use a favorite city or hobby to inspire all the wedding day details)
  • Cultural (a black-and-red banquet-style affair for a Chinese wedding)
  • Beach (a seaside affair with nautical elements and blues and greens)
  • Destination (in Italy or the Bahamas; a vacation for guests)

What’s our budget?
You need to ask all contributing parties (bride’s parents, groom’s parents, yourselves), how much they are willing to put into the wedding fund. Your budget will dictate many of your wedding decisions.

What are our priorities?
Together, decide the three most important elements of the wedding day for each of you. That’s where you could give a little more money and attention. And, it will help make divvying up responsibilities easier. If he is all about the music, let him scope out possible bands and DJs. If you want a couture gown, you might have to opt for a less expensive invitation.

How involved will the groom be?
To avoid the I’m-doing-everything fight later, set expectations now for how the groom should be included.

Who’s got the final say?
It’s tricky when multiple parties are helping to cover the wedding costs, but the ultimate decisions should be yours. Subtly make this known early on, again, to avoid hurt feelings later.

Excerpted from The Knot Book of Wedding Lists, published by Clarkson Potter/Publishers
© 2009 The Knot, Inc. All rights reserved.

More from The Knot

Gourmet Sugar Favors for your shower

Posted on April 18, 2011 at 3:40 PM Comments comments (116)
What to give as a favor for a bridal shower????
 Here is a "Sweet" idea.

Gourmet Sugar Company adds everyday elegance to your coffee and tea experience by going “outside the cube” to offer you beautifully shaped sugars to sweeten your coffee and tea.

They use only the finest organic sugar that is produced from 100% organic sugar cane juice as well as vegan sugar that goes through a 100% animal-free refining process. Their gourmet sugars come in a variety of shapes and flavors including: organic seashells, cinnamon hearts, peppermint shapes and vegan fleur de lys.

Gourmet sugars are available in over 50 shapes that can be used to customize any special occasion in your life. 
Why not give a little something sweet to the ones you love with The Gourmet Sugar Company?

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